On the exterior we remove the siding on the front of the garage and installed new hardboard siding that matched the original on the building. Electrically we removed and relocated existing lights and added a ceiling fan as well as recessed lighting. Some additional outlets and network wiring was installed then connected to the home and panel box. The interior was insulated in areas such as the ceiling, stairwell and miscellaneous sections of the walls. We laminated (overlay) the existing sheetrock with 3/8″ wallboard on the sidewalls and stairwell and 1/2″ for the ceiling.

Have a ballpark figure in mind. Determine what you can comfortably afford to spend on your garage remodeling or building project. Where does it fall in your list of home improvement priorities? Will you be spending 100% of your remodeling and construction budget on it? Having a clear idea of your price ceiling will help you avoid making choices that are too expensive or elaborate and having to scale back in the process.
It’s often not enough to just make sure your garage doesn’t look bad. Sometimes you need to use this space to add some style or emphasis to your home to help it stand out from the crowd. Your first step is to look around your neighborhood at comparable properties. Look and see what they have done with theirs. The goal is to outdo your neighbors, but only just so much. You don’t want to price yourself over the market. Some upgrade options to consider are;
If the concrete slab in the garage is the problem, there are more cost-effective solutions than a concrete mason. Most cracking, flaking, stains, pitting or wear can be easily fixed by calling a concrete specialist to apply either an inexpensive epoxy or polyurethane-based coating. These seals are very durable and can make your garage floor look brand new.
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