I just finished "re-modeling" my garage...before I touched it it had just taped drywall and concrete block walls, unfinished cement floor, wires for the garage door openers hanging all over the place, holes in all the walls/ceiling. It was a typical, dirty, dark garage.I painted the concrete walls with Behr waterproof masonry paint and the rest of the walls and ceiling with the same color behr paint (twilight gray-to lighten it up).I did the floor with Behr 1 Part Epoxy, which, takes forever to prep for, but the result is worth it. You first need to sweep very good, then clean/de-grease and etch the concrete using a floor cleaner rented from HD...then let it dry. I let it dry for about 2 weeks. Once I was sure the concrete was dry, I applied 2 coats of concrete bonding primer. I let that dry for about 24 hours, and I was finally ready for the paint. The paint goes on easy, one coat was plenty. I sprinlled in some color flakes and let it dry 24hrs. I then began my first of three coates of low gloss sealer. The finished result was very pleasing...I then re-installed my Gladiator Garage Works 8 foot work bench, wall cabinet and tool chest as well as a second wall cabinet and large gearbox that I purchased for my new garage... I also built a wooden cabinet around the circuit breakers and painted it gray along with the framing for the garage doors, a beam in the middle and the door into the house. I finished with gray vinyl trim molding around the walls.I also mounted the bikes, a shop Vac and misc. brooms, saw horse, etc... on the wall(s). All of the wires from the garage door openers were hanging down and sloppy (prev. owner) so I disconected everything and ran it through PVC for a cleaner look. I then added a few finishing touches, Bud Light neon clock, pictures (NE Patriots Cheerleaders), and mounted my novelty license plate collection as well as a few other items...Moving all of my furniture/tools out of the garage was a big project in itself, and I lost my basement(i.e. Gym) for about a month and a half, but the end result is a very clean, organized garage that is "my" place...
Your garage remodeling project isn’t necessarily the easiest endeavor. Too often a homeowner will just forge ahead with a great idea and hope it turns our alright. Needless to say, this is not often the case, most remodels do not go easily. Even if you think of a good plan, it probably is missing something. Trust us, unless you are a professional contractor, you haven’t thought of everything. Our tips will make you look like you have done this a thousand times.
Unlike many other home remodeling projects, it’s very easy to tell when you need to replace your garage door spring; your overhead garage door won’t open or perhaps more obvious, the weight of the door is off. When your spring is working correctly, you should be able to manually lift the garage door very easily. Likewise, when you open it, the garage door should not move and stay where you left it. If the garage door is very heavy or it closes as soon as you let go, then you need a new spring.
When considering a small garage remodel, you can pay as little as $2,500 to as much as $30,000.  On average, the cost will be around $11,000, if you consider the national average. These costs are not set in stone, though. Your choices on materials will largely determine the overall cost. Your budget will take less of a hit on a smaller garage, which is another bonus, and there are many ways to save. A breakdown of the costs follows.
Like wood stains, masonry stains are less viscous than paints. They soak into the masonry and don't form a film the way paint does. Unlike film-forming coatings, stains won't make your garage floor feel like the deck of an aircraft carrier. Because of this, stains are somewhat more forgiving and easier to apply and reapply as they wear off and become dirty. One of the oldest (perhaps the oldest) masonry stains available is H&C, now owned by Sherwin-Williams and sold at local paint stores. This venerable brand has been used in the Southern U.S. for many years. It's available in a wide range of colors and it can be tinted to any color you prefer. It's available in two formulations: a solvent-base (that is unavailable in California) and a waterborne acrylic available nationwide. The solvent-based formulation is the tougher one, so if you have both available, choose the stronger route unless you're very sensitive to solvent fumes.
Windows are important features when considering garage remodeling costs. Garage windows should be checked and replaced, if necessary, during any garage remodeling project. Not only are garage windows susceptible to the elements, but they also provide intruders another way into the home. Check for drafts, broken window locks and consider using metal cages around the windows for increased safety.
Every project comes down to cost, so it only makes sense to start there. According to our garage remodeling cost estimator, the average garage remodel runs $8,582. Keep in mind, this takes the full garage into consideration. That includes the garage door, flooring, windows and plenty of other renovations. For those remodeling one aspect of their garage, of course, expect the final price to be much less. In fact, we have even seen garage remodels cost as low as $900.

A garage remodel can take many different forms. Some finished garages are transformed into guest bedrooms, game rooms, man caves or even master bathrooms. Others go the traditional route and clean it up to just keep their cars inside. The traditional route is certainly more cost-effective, but after analyzing national garage remodeling costs, the average price to renovate a garage is roughly $10,000.

Don’t make the mistake of beginning your garage remodel before you know the basics. Learn how to do it right instead of just diving in. There are many reasons that home owners want to remodel their garage. It is often more difficult to put an addition onto a home than it is to use your garage. Perhaps your parents need a place to enjoy their golden years. Or your kids may be staying home longer than expected.
The extras on a garage often get short attention, but those little details can make a big impact. Take lighting and house numbers: Choices more in step with your garage's style can tie together paint, materials, and more. Use proportion as your guide when selecting fixtures: Low-slung styles such as this garage work better with small to medium fixtures.

If you have an existing garage in place, but no walls, floor, ceiling or finishes in place, the cost to finish your garage will be much less expensive than $10,000. Oftentimes, finished a garage entails adding a few beams or drywall. Contractors can install wooden or steal beams for a few thousand dollars. In addition, according to our drywall installation cost guide, you can purchase drywall for at little as $0.30/sf. If you hire a general contractor to install the drywall, expect to pay another $1,000. Overall, the cost to finish a garage should not exceed $5,000.
If the concrete slab in the garage is the problem, there are more cost-effective solutions than a concrete mason. Most cracking, flaking, stains, pitting or wear can be easily fixed by calling a concrete specialist to apply either an inexpensive epoxy or polyurethane-based coating. These seals are very durable and can make your garage floor look brand new.

Paint manufacturers have recognized these problems and have come to the rescue with new solutions. But a word of advice: If your garage floor sees heavy water leakage, if it's badly cracked or if it's damp and slimy all summer, don't apply any coating. In those cases, you're better off simply keeping it as clean as you can and then calling it quits. 
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