Your garage remodeling project isn’t necessarily the easiest endeavor. Too often a homeowner will just forge ahead with a great idea and hope it turns our alright. Needless to say, this is not often the case, most remodels do not go easily. Even if you think of a good plan, it probably is missing something. Trust us, unless you are a professional contractor, you haven’t thought of everything. Our tips will make you look like you have done this a thousand times.
Pick: Pick what your new room is going to focus on. Your small garage can either do one thing perfectly or a lot of things partially. Think of it like any small room in your home. Your small bedroom wouldn’t be able to be a bedroom, media room, work space, and storage area. Your small garage can’t do all of these things either. So pick one focus and ensure your plan addresses it. Some average room sizes to help you pick are:
Conversion: Depending on your circumstances you may want to look into how to convert your garage into a functional room. This is not always the best option, and largely depends on what other houses comparable to yours look like. If other homes in your area have more square feet available, or more bedrooms it may make sense to convert your garage into a bedroom.

Know your priorities. Will your garage be purely functional? If so, durable surfaces and systems trump expensive trappings. Make a list of what you’ll need, from storage to appliances to furnishings, and then rank every item in order of importance. That way, if you have to cut things as you get farther into the process, it will be easier to make choices.
The first step is often fixing a cracked floor or leveling it, and sometimes even staining it to make it look more attractive; the repairs cost $500-$12,500, and stains range from $2 to $10 per square foot. Drywall is typically put up, which costs from $1 to $2 per square foot. Adding boards for a storage space above the garage typically costs about $2 per square foot.
One of the best ways to have a garage space that increases your home value is to make sure it is in good repair. When a potential buyer does their very first walk through your garage can help make or break the sale. If it hasn’t been touched in 20 years the time to spruce it up is before the first buyer comes to look. When thinking about a garage that is in good repair think about things such as;
Every city has certain building codes all homes must follow. One popular item many homeowners have to add when they convert their garage into a living area or bedroom is a new window. Building codes require living spaces to have a window large enough for a person to crawl out of in case of an emergency. Single window installation costs start at $1,200.
Paint manufacturers have recognized these problems and have come to the rescue with new solutions. But a word of advice: If your garage floor sees heavy water leakage, if it's badly cracked or if it's damp and slimy all summer, don't apply any coating. In those cases, you're better off simply keeping it as clean as you can and then calling it quits.
When it comes to design, nothing provides more a boost than the actual garage door. Not only can they match the architecture of your home, but they come in a wide range of sizes, styles and components. Chances are, you already have a garage door, but years of opening and closing, along with general wear and tear, can bring about a fair share of issues.
I just finished "re-modeling" my garage...before I touched it it had just taped drywall and concrete block walls, unfinished cement floor, wires for the garage door openers hanging all over the place, holes in all the walls/ceiling. It was a typical, dirty, dark garage.I painted the concrete walls with Behr waterproof masonry paint and the rest of the walls and ceiling with the same color behr paint (twilight gray-to lighten it up).I did the floor with Behr 1 Part Epoxy, which, takes forever to prep for, but the result is worth it. You first need to sweep very good, then clean/de-grease and etch the concrete using a floor cleaner rented from HD...then let it dry. I let it dry for about 2 weeks. Once I was sure the concrete was dry, I applied 2 coats of concrete bonding primer. I let that dry for about 24 hours, and I was finally ready for the paint. The paint goes on easy, one coat was plenty. I sprinlled in some color flakes and let it dry 24hrs. I then began my first of three coates of low gloss sealer. The finished result was very pleasing...I then re-installed my Gladiator Garage Works 8 foot work bench, wall cabinet and tool chest as well as a second wall cabinet and large gearbox that I purchased for my new garage... I also built a wooden cabinet around the circuit breakers and painted it gray along with the framing for the garage doors, a beam in the middle and the door into the house. I finished with gray vinyl trim molding around the walls.I also mounted the bikes, a shop Vac and misc. brooms, saw horse, etc... on the wall(s). All of the wires from the garage door openers were hanging down and sloppy (prev. owner) so I disconected everything and ran it through PVC for a cleaner look. I then added a few finishing touches, Bud Light neon clock, pictures (NE Patriots Cheerleaders), and mounted my novelty license plate collection as well as a few other items...Moving all of my furniture/tools out of the garage was a big project in itself, and I lost my basement(i.e. Gym) for about a month and a half, but the end result is a very clean, organized garage that is "my" place...
Determine needs vs wants: There is always a difference between what you WANT in your garage, and what you NEED. While you may want a high end entertainment complex, do you need it? Before you begin your project sit down and make a list of needs, and wants. By creating a prioritized list you keep yourself from overspending. Once you have your needs addressed, throw in a few wants.

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