An insulated garage will stay cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. The first step is to be sure the attic is well ventilated. Check to see how many attic and roof vents you have. A good rule of thumb is a total of 1 sq. ft. (144 sq. in.) of vent opening per 300 sq. ft. of attic divided between the soffit and roof vents. For a typical 20 x 22-ft. garage, you’d need about six 4-in. x 12-in. soffit vents and two standard square roof vents. Make sure your ventilation is effective by installing vent chutes between the trusses. Vent chutes have a channel that prevents blown insulation from blocking the airflow from the soffit vents to the attic space. Plug the area under the vent with wood blocking or plastic and a chunk of fiberglass insulation to prevent wind from blowing up through the insulation or insulation from filling the soffit.
When it comes to design, nothing provides more a boost than the actual garage door. Not only can they match the architecture of your home, but they come in a wide range of sizes, styles and components. Chances are, you already have a garage door, but years of opening and closing, along with general wear and tear, can bring about a fair share of issues.
Before you install the drywall, temporarily remove the brackets that support the garage door tracks and opener. This will make it easier to install the 4-mil poly and ceiling drywall and will result in a neater-looking job. Start by carefully measuring and recording the position of the tracks and opener. Measure from the nearest wall and from the floor. Then close the garage door, lock it closed and unplug the opener to disable it. Unscrew or unbolt the brackets that support the garage door tracks and remove them. Also remove the garage door opener brackets and support the opener on a ladder. It may be easier to entirely disconnect the opener and set it aside. Reinstall the garage door track brackets using a new section of angle iron on the ceiling. Attach each new ceiling angle iron with four 5/16-in. x 3-in. lag screws driven into the center of the ceiling joist or into wood blocking that’s screwed to the adjacent ceiling framing.

I just finished "re-modeling" my garage...before I touched it it had just taped drywall and concrete block walls, unfinished cement floor, wires for the garage door openers hanging all over the place, holes in all the walls/ceiling. It was a typical, dirty, dark garage.I painted the concrete walls with Behr waterproof masonry paint and the rest of the walls and ceiling with the same color behr paint (twilight gray-to lighten it up).I did the floor with Behr 1 Part Epoxy, which, takes forever to prep for, but the result is worth it. You first need to sweep very good, then clean/de-grease and etch the concrete using a floor cleaner rented from HD...then let it dry. I let it dry for about 2 weeks. Once I was sure the concrete was dry, I applied 2 coats of concrete bonding primer. I let that dry for about 24 hours, and I was finally ready for the paint. The paint goes on easy, one coat was plenty. I sprinlled in some color flakes and let it dry 24hrs. I then began my first of three coates of low gloss sealer. The finished result was very pleasing...I then re-installed my Gladiator Garage Works 8 foot work bench, wall cabinet and tool chest as well as a second wall cabinet and large gearbox that I purchased for my new garage... I also built a wooden cabinet around the circuit breakers and painted it gray along with the framing for the garage doors, a beam in the middle and the door into the house. I finished with gray vinyl trim molding around the walls.I also mounted the bikes, a shop Vac and misc. brooms, saw horse, etc... on the wall(s). All of the wires from the garage door openers were hanging down and sloppy (prev. owner) so I disconected everything and ran it through PVC for a cleaner look. I then added a few finishing touches, Bud Light neon clock, pictures (NE Patriots Cheerleaders), and mounted my novelty license plate collection as well as a few other items...Moving all of my furniture/tools out of the garage was a big project in itself, and I lost my basement(i.e. Gym) for about a month and a half, but the end result is a very clean, organized garage that is "my" place...
For a garage-to-utility-room conversion, budget at least $6,000 for appliances, a utility sink, and space for sorting, folding and hanging laundry. A new utility room in place of an old garage brings convenience into your life, especially if you've spent years dragging loads of laundry up and down the stairs. This conversion will cost a bit more due to the addition of plumbing, but it'll be worth it.

The floors of your new space are a unique issue. Your garage is built with drainage in mind. Code requirements mandate that the concrete slab has a slope built into it to ensure water drains away from the home. The installation of the subfloor will correct the slope issue of your floor. Using a subfloor allows your new space to be converted back into a garage should the next home owner wish to do so.
If the concrete slab in the garage is the problem, there are more cost-effective solutions than a concrete mason. Most cracking, flaking, stains, pitting or wear can be easily fixed by calling a concrete specialist to apply either an inexpensive epoxy or polyurethane-based coating. These seals are very durable and can make your garage floor look brand new.
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