The home office will cost at least $5,000, making it one of the more affordable options when it comes to converting your garage into living space. Like a bedroom, a home office needs all the basic amenities, such as walls, floors, and a ceiling. It needs climate control and a window. This room may also require additional outlets that let you connect computers, printers and charging stations. You'll need internet access and a high-speed connection, as well as lots of storage and organization options.

One of the biggest impacts you can make to a refreshed garage has little to do with the garage itself: Add containers potted with pretty blooms. The planters help to soften the edges between structure and landscape and add pops of visual interest to what is often a neutral facade. Here, miniature trellises up the columns add even more growing spots, with delicate vines that clamor up toward the pergola. Another idea: Use hanging baskets on either side of a garage’s door.
Every city has certain building codes all homes must follow. One popular item many homeowners have to add when they convert their garage into a living area or bedroom is a new window. Building codes require living spaces to have a window large enough for a person to crawl out of in case of an emergency. Single window installation costs start at $1,200.
Like wood stains, masonry stains are less viscous than paints. They soak into the masonry and don't form a film the way paint does. Unlike film-forming coatings, stains won't make your garage floor feel like the deck of an aircraft carrier. Because of this, stains are somewhat more forgiving and easier to apply and reapply as they wear off and become dirty. One of the oldest (perhaps the oldest) masonry stains available is H&C, now owned by Sherwin-Williams and sold at local paint stores. This venerable brand has been used in the Southern U.S. for many years. It's available in a wide range of colors and it can be tinted to any color you prefer. It's available in two formulations: a solvent-base (that is unavailable in California) and a waterborne acrylic available nationwide. The solvent-based formulation is the tougher one, so if you have both available, choose the stronger route unless you're very sensitive to solvent fumes.
There are a few different options when it comes to garage renovation basics, but finishing materials provide the most options and the most flexibility. Flooring alone offers a dozen or so choices, from inexpensive laminate and carpet to elegant hardwood and natural stone. A great discrepancy in quality (and therefore costs) also exists between different types of cabinets, countertops, light fixtures, plumbing fixtures, appliances, wall finishes, ceilings, windows, doors, molding, heating systems, and much more. And of course, depending on your intended use for the room, you'll need to buy furniture, appliances, curtains, decorations, and all the other complimentary odds and ends.
Heating & AC ($1000-$5000): Adding central heat and air into your garage can either be simple or difficult. If you have a robust heating and air conditioning system in place it is as simple as expanding your existing ducting. If the additional square footage is more than your system can handle you will need to add in a new unit. Luckily, a small garage usually is able to be fit into your existing system.
For a garage-to-utility-room conversion, budget at least $6,000 for appliances, a utility sink, and space for sorting, folding and hanging laundry. A new utility room in place of an old garage brings convenience into your life, especially if you've spent years dragging loads of laundry up and down the stairs. This conversion will cost a bit more due to the addition of plumbing, but it'll be worth it.
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