The first step is often fixing a cracked floor or leveling it, and sometimes even staining it to make it look more attractive; the repairs cost $500-$12,500, and stains range from $2 to $10 per square foot. Drywall is typically put up, which costs from $1 to $2 per square foot. Adding boards for a storage space above the garage typically costs about $2 per square foot.
Paint manufacturers have recognized these problems and have come to the rescue with new solutions. But a word of advice: If your garage floor sees heavy water leakage, if it's badly cracked or if it's damp and slimy all summer, don't apply any coating. In those cases, you're better off simply keeping it as clean as you can and then calling it quits.
Pick: Pick what your new room is going to focus on. Your small garage can either do one thing perfectly or a lot of things partially. Think of it like any small room in your home. Your small bedroom wouldn’t be able to be a bedroom, media room, work space, and storage area. Your small garage can’t do all of these things either. So pick one focus and ensure your plan addresses it. Some average room sizes to help you pick are:

Conversion: Depending on your circumstances you may want to look into how to convert your garage into a functional room. This is not always the best option, and largely depends on what other houses comparable to yours look like. If other homes in your area have more square feet available, or more bedrooms it may make sense to convert your garage into a bedroom.


The floors of your new space are a unique issue. Your garage is built with drainage in mind. Code requirements mandate that the concrete slab has a slope built into it to ensure water drains away from the home. The installation of the subfloor will correct the slope issue of your floor. Using a subfloor allows your new space to be converted back into a garage should the next home owner wish to do so.
Determine needs vs wants: There is always a difference between what you WANT in your garage, and what you NEED. While you may want a high end entertainment complex, do you need it? Before you begin your project sit down and make a list of needs, and wants. By creating a prioritized list you keep yourself from overspending. Once you have your needs addressed, throw in a few wants.

The first step is often fixing a cracked floor or leveling it, and sometimes even staining it to make it look more attractive; the repairs cost $500-$12,500, and stains range from $2 to $10 per square foot. Drywall is typically put up, which costs from $1 to $2 per square foot. Adding boards for a storage space above the garage typically costs about $2 per square foot.

There are a remarkable number of garage options that vary widely in design and price. If your doors could use a functional and aesthetic upgrade, consider budgeting for replacements that include enough extras that they help boost your curb appeal. These pretty doors include old-style pulls as well as small windowpanes, all painted in a color to blend with the rest of the home.
One of the main ways to succeed on a budget is to be organized and have a good plan. Having a good plan means knowing exactly what you want out of it. This requires you to decide everything from paint colors to trim style before the first nail is driven. Having a well thought out plan means knowing where you are getting materials from, and when they will be delivered. This plan is the bedrock that your budget friendly remodel will rest on.

With most garage renovations, flooring is usually the prime focus. Many garages are made entirely of concrete and brick work, and replacing or repairing concrete can be very costly. In cases where the floor or walls are severely damaged, a concrete mason must be called. In this scenario, materials come at a low cost, but working with concrete is very time consuming, which can lead to a large labor bill.
Your garage remodeling project isn’t necessarily the easiest endeavor. Too often a homeowner will just forge ahead with a great idea and hope it turns our alright. Needless to say, this is not often the case, most remodels do not go easily. Even if you think of a good plan, it probably is missing something. Trust us, unless you are a professional contractor, you haven’t thought of everything. Our tips will make you look like you have done this a thousand times.

Before launching a project, the homeowner should draw up a plan that takes into account the various ways the garage could ideally be used. GarageAbility, for instance, will divide a garage into zones for storing garden equipment, sporting goods and tools as well as space for working on hobbies, then help the homeowner determine the storage systems that will work best for their belongings.
Know your priorities. Will your garage be purely functional? If so, durable surfaces and systems trump expensive trappings. Make a list of what you’ll need, from storage to appliances to furnishings, and then rank every item in order of importance. That way, if you have to cut things as you get farther into the process, it will be easier to make choices.

On the exterior we remove the siding on the front of the garage and installed new hardboard siding that matched the original on the building. Electrically we removed and relocated existing lights and added a ceiling fan as well as recessed lighting. Some additional outlets and network wiring was installed then connected to the home and panel box. The interior was insulated in areas such as the ceiling, stairwell and miscellaneous sections of the walls. We laminated (overlay) the existing sheetrock with 3/8″ wallboard on the sidewalls and stairwell and 1/2″ for the ceiling.

For a garage-to-utility-room conversion, budget at least $6,000 for appliances, a utility sink, and space for sorting, folding and hanging laundry. A new utility room in place of an old garage brings convenience into your life, especially if you've spent years dragging loads of laundry up and down the stairs. This conversion will cost a bit more due to the addition of plumbing, but it'll be worth it.
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