It’s often not enough to just make sure your garage doesn’t look bad. Sometimes you need to use this space to add some style or emphasis to your home to help it stand out from the crowd. Your first step is to look around your neighborhood at comparable properties. Look and see what they have done with theirs. The goal is to outdo your neighbors, but only just so much. You don’t want to price yourself over the market. Some upgrade options to consider are;

Most rough-framed garages aren’t ready for drywall. Your garage may be missing studs at the corners and attachment points for the ceiling drywall. To see where framing members may be missing, inspect inside corners where walls meet and where the walls meet the ceiling. These are the most common areas needing additional framing. These two photos show how to add ceiling blocking.

Naturally, you have to know the cost of these things in order to calculate what you can afford to spend. That’s also the best way to ensure that you don’t stumble across any unwelcome surprises during the execution of your project. Using our free estimate for your garage remodel will help you create a realistic budget that actually meets your needs!
If you're planning to maximize the space, add useful features, and otherwise make changes that are likely to appeal to a majority of homeowners, your renovation may end up being a worthwhile investment in your home's resale value. However, the quality of the work matters, especially if you're planning a major change such as converting the garage into a bedroom. Trading your garage space for a poorly insulated "bedroom" with no windows and the garage door intact won't do much to boost resale value.
This single car garage is another great structure that would be a great addition to any property. Though it only has room for one full-sized vehicle it is still a very functional building. And it also has a side entry door which makes getting in and out of this building convenient. Especially if you decided to use it for a workshop or for additional storage.
I just finished "re-modeling" my garage...before I touched it it had just taped drywall and concrete block walls, unfinished cement floor, wires for the garage door openers hanging all over the place, holes in all the walls/ceiling. It was a typical, dirty, dark garage.I painted the concrete walls with Behr waterproof masonry paint and the rest of the walls and ceiling with the same color behr paint (twilight gray-to lighten it up).I did the floor with Behr 1 Part Epoxy, which, takes forever to prep for, but the result is worth it. You first need to sweep very good, then clean/de-grease and etch the concrete using a floor cleaner rented from HD...then let it dry. I let it dry for about 2 weeks. Once I was sure the concrete was dry, I applied 2 coats of concrete bonding primer. I let that dry for about 24 hours, and I was finally ready for the paint. The paint goes on easy, one coat was plenty. I sprinlled in some color flakes and let it dry 24hrs. I then began my first of three coates of low gloss sealer. The finished result was very pleasing...I then re-installed my Gladiator Garage Works 8 foot work bench, wall cabinet and tool chest as well as a second wall cabinet and large gearbox that I purchased for my new garage... I also built a wooden cabinet around the circuit breakers and painted it gray along with the framing for the garage doors, a beam in the middle and the door into the house. I finished with gray vinyl trim molding around the walls.I also mounted the bikes, a shop Vac and misc. brooms, saw horse, etc... on the wall(s). All of the wires from the garage door openers were hanging down and sloppy (prev. owner) so I disconected everything and ran it through PVC for a cleaner look. I then added a few finishing touches, Bud Light neon clock, pictures (NE Patriots Cheerleaders), and mounted my novelty license plate collection as well as a few other items...Moving all of my furniture/tools out of the garage was a big project in itself, and I lost my basement(i.e. Gym) for about a month and a half, but the end result is a very clean, organized garage that is "my" place...

Is your garage currently only being used for storing things? Well, if it is, maybe you should consider putting it to better use. This article will explore the many possibilities a garage could give you, how to remodel it, and how to make sure you don’t break the bank doing it. We’ve divided it into different sections, each can be accessed through the links below, or you can simply scroll in order to read it in its entirety.


In terms of costs, the average price to repair a garage door is only $202. Overhead garage doors see the most damage. In addition to the springs, which I will get to later, other elements that need casual repairs include hinges, rollers and the track itself. For example, debris can get caught in the track or it can dent. These are both easy fixes or about an hour's worth of labor from a garage repair specialist. Average hourly labor is usually around $85.
Windows are important features when considering garage remodeling costs. Garage windows should be checked and replaced, if necessary, during any garage remodeling project. Not only are garage windows susceptible to the elements, but they also provide intruders another way into the home. Check for drafts, broken window locks and consider using metal cages around the windows for increased safety.
If the concrete slab in the garage is the problem, there are more cost-effective solutions than a concrete mason. Most cracking, flaking, stains, pitting or wear can be easily fixed by calling a concrete specialist to apply either an inexpensive epoxy or polyurethane-based coating. These seals are very durable and can make your garage floor look brand new.
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