Dream Construction, Joe R and his team, were friendly, responsive, and knowledgable about the remodel. Permits were acquired for the work and Joe supervised the foundation leveling necessary to repair the old remodel. He helped us determine what we needed to make our house more energy efficient. His work has saved us hundreds of dollars in energy bills! Great experience.
Older homes have smaller garages. This is a simple architectural truth. In the past cars were smaller, and most families owned a single car. This means your older home has less garage to work with. Where a new home may have a garage that is up to 50% of the square footage of your home, an older home may have a one car garage that is no more than 200 square feet. Knowing how to remodel a small garage begins with knowing the 5 P’s.
Before you install the drywall, temporarily remove the brackets that support the garage door tracks and opener. This will make it easier to install the 4-mil poly and ceiling drywall and will result in a neater-looking job. Start by carefully measuring and recording the position of the tracks and opener. Measure from the nearest wall and from the floor. Then close the garage door, lock it closed and unplug the opener to disable it. Unscrew or unbolt the brackets that support the garage door tracks and remove them. Also remove the garage door opener brackets and support the opener on a ladder. It may be easier to entirely disconnect the opener and set it aside. Reinstall the garage door track brackets using a new section of angle iron on the ceiling. Attach each new ceiling angle iron with four 5/16-in. x 3-in. lag screws driven into the center of the ceiling joist or into wood blocking that’s screwed to the adjacent ceiling framing.
Start by insulating the walls. Buy unfaced R-13 batts for 2×4 walls and unfaced R-19 batts for 2×6 walls. Match the width of the batt (15-1/4 in. or 23-1/4 in.) to the stud space. Cut batts carefully for a tight fit. Next, staple 4-mil poly to the walls and ceiling. Embed the poly sheeting in caulk around the perimeter of each piece to create an airtight seal. Seal the seams between sheets and seal the poly to electrical boxes with caulk or special sheathing tape (it’s typically red and looks like packing tape).

The cost to finish a garage is often less than the cost of a remodel, coming in at an average of about $5,000. Finishes should factor high on your list of materials before you ever begin your garage conversion. The answers to the following questions will go far in determining your budget. Low-end finishes will save you big bucks at the time of renovation, but high-end finishes will help recoup your ROI when it comes time to sell.


For a garage-to-utility-room conversion, budget at least $6,000 for appliances, a utility sink, and space for sorting, folding and hanging laundry. A new utility room in place of an old garage brings convenience into your life, especially if you've spent years dragging loads of laundry up and down the stairs. This conversion will cost a bit more due to the addition of plumbing, but it'll be worth it. 
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