Update Fixtures: If you have either old, or the most basic fixtures spend a little money and upgrade them. Utility lighting doesn’t have to be bare bulbs with an economy base. Use fixtures that fit into your garage design. Sometimes it has exterior lights, or interior lighting fixtures that just look completely out of place. Make sure you change out these fixtures to ones that fit the area.
As you plan, the following tips can be indispensable. Don’t start without giving this list a look. Our list can save money, time, and money, and hassle. Go over these tips and apply all the ones you can to your own project. Remember that this is a starting point and that you should try to use these to help your own brainstorming for more ideas specific to your own situation.
The first step in planning a garage conversion is deciding upon the room's new intended purpose. Do you need a place for teens to hang out at home with friends? Are you dreaming of a large, luxury man cave? Maybe you'd just enjoy an upgraded space to park your cars in winter - one that's fully insulated and climate controlled? Before you decide, keep a few factors in mind:
A full-scale apartment or guest house will take you to the top of your budget and beyond at an average between $15,000 to $30,000. You'll need to make all the upgrades mentioned for a family room, along with a separate bath and kitchen. You'll need to run a gas line or a 220 outlet for the stove. You'll also want a private entrance for your apartment, which usually entails adding a fire door.
The home office will cost at least $5,000, making it one of the more affordable options when it comes to converting your garage into living space. Like a bedroom, a home office needs all the basic amenities, such as walls, floors, and a ceiling. It needs climate control and a window. This room may also require additional outlets that let you connect computers, printers and charging stations. You'll need internet access and a high-speed connection, as well as lots of storage and organization options.
Waterproof paint (for concrete walls) • Paint (dry wall) • Behr concrete cleaner (2 Gal) • Behr Concrete Etcher (2 Gal) • Behr Concrete Bonding Primer (1 Gal) • Behr 1-Part Epoxy Paint (2 Gal.) • MiscPainting Supplies • Stainless steel light switch/receptical covers • Lumber for cabinet over circuit breakers • Gladiator Garage Works workbench-Wall cabinets-tall cabinet • Hooks for bicycles/tools • Tapcon masonary drill bits • PVC (to run wires for garage door openers
For those searching for more room when you decide to remodel two spaces come quickly to mind. These are your garage and your attic. Both have benefits and drawbacks as far as conversion to a bedroom or usable space goes. It is a bit more easily converted than your attic and can result in a beautiful living space. Before you begin work you should know the real garage remodeling costs involved. Converting your garage to a bedroom requires certain elements that are not necessary for a family room. When converting your garage to a bedroom you will need to have a window that serves as a secondary escape route, and a closet. There are additional requirements by code, but these are the main ones to consider.
The cost to finish a garage is often less than the cost of a remodel, coming in at an average of about $5,000. Finishes should factor high on your list of materials before you ever begin your garage conversion. The answers to the following questions will go far in determining your budget. Low-end finishes will save you big bucks at the time of renovation, but high-end finishes will help recoup your ROI when it comes time to sell.
Most unfinished garages have the bare minimum of outlets and lights, so you’ll want to add a few. And in some cases, you’ll have to reroute wiring that’s attached to the face of studs or the underside of ceiling framing. We had to reroute phone wires, door opener control wires and plastic-sheathed cable in our garage. Remove surface-mounted wiring and move it into the stud space, or reroute it over the top of the ceiling joists or trusses.
Dots remodeling did an awesome job painting our house. We had lots of estimates but none of them seem to care about our project as much as Dots. Our house is very large with multiple colors. Dots and his crew handled it with ease. I was very impressed with his work ethic. he kept us informed, cleaned up at the end of each day and the paint job looks Fabulous!! I highly recommend Dotsemodeling
If you are considering a new bedroom, take into account the number of bathrooms in the home. The usual ration is one bathroom to two bedrooms. This means if you have a three bedroom and two bath home, adding another bedroom is fine. If you have a two bedroom and one bath home, adding another bathroom means you really would need to add a bathroom as well.
Every city has certain building codes all homes must follow. One popular item many homeowners have to add when they convert their garage into a living area or bedroom is a new window. Building codes require living spaces to have a window large enough for a person to crawl out of in case of an emergency. Single window installation costs start at $1,200.
Flooring: Concrete slabs are cold, hard, and not very pretty to the eyes. Even if you’re on a tight budget, installing new floors during your garage conversion could be worth your while in terms of comfort and aesthetics. Vinyl flooring is one of the more cost-effective options and is available in many different designs made to look like wood, tile, or natural stone. If the space is framed in and moisture isn’t a concern, carpet is also a viable option for softer flooring as long as insulation occurs beforehand.
A garage can be so much more than a messy catch-all for items that don’t fit inside the home. Through a remodel, it can be made into an organized storage unit or a workshop, or simply made more functional, with room for at least one car. Turning a standard 600-square-foot, two-car garage into a well-organized, tidy space is less expensive than most remodeling projects. Because a garage already has a floor, walls and a roof, the primary tasks are finishing the framed walls and adding organizational systems.

I just finished "re-modeling" my garage...before I touched it it had just taped drywall and concrete block walls, unfinished cement floor, wires for the garage door openers hanging all over the place, holes in all the walls/ceiling. It was a typical, dirty, dark garage.I painted the concrete walls with Behr waterproof masonry paint and the rest of the walls and ceiling with the same color behr paint (twilight gray-to lighten it up).I did the floor with Behr 1 Part Epoxy, which, takes forever to prep for, but the result is worth it. You first need to sweep very good, then clean/de-grease and etch the concrete using a floor cleaner rented from HD...then let it dry. I let it dry for about 2 weeks. Once I was sure the concrete was dry, I applied 2 coats of concrete bonding primer. I let that dry for about 24 hours, and I was finally ready for the paint. The paint goes on easy, one coat was plenty. I sprinlled in some color flakes and let it dry 24hrs. I then began my first of three coates of low gloss sealer. The finished result was very pleasing...I then re-installed my Gladiator Garage Works 8 foot work bench, wall cabinet and tool chest as well as a second wall cabinet and large gearbox that I purchased for my new garage... I also built a wooden cabinet around the circuit breakers and painted it gray along with the framing for the garage doors, a beam in the middle and the door into the house. I finished with gray vinyl trim molding around the walls.I also mounted the bikes, a shop Vac and misc. brooms, saw horse, etc... on the wall(s). All of the wires from the garage door openers were hanging down and sloppy (prev. owner) so I disconected everything and ran it through PVC for a cleaner look. I then added a few finishing touches, Bud Light neon clock, pictures (NE Patriots Cheerleaders), and mounted my novelty license plate collection as well as a few other items...Moving all of my furniture/tools out of the garage was a big project in itself, and I lost my basement(i.e. Gym) for about a month and a half, but the end result is a very clean, organized garage that is "my" place...

Forty-something years later, Michael still doesn't' know what he wants to do if he grows up. Raised around cars and trained in diesel mechanics, Michael has owned a successful detail shop, developed and sold software, led a K-9 SAR team, ridden the dot-com wave as a marketing & PR executive, led digital strategy teams at both large and small agencies, and now this. He digs Jeeps, off-road racing, football, photography, writing, making EDM, cranking metal, PC gaming, and a plethora of other contradictory things.
Your garage is an often untouched part of your home. The uncomfortable truth is that far too often it is not used for our vehicles. A study put the percentage of homes that actually use their garages for parking at an astonishing 15%. This means the overwhelming number of garages are merely storage rooms.  This is especially true when you have a smaller one. The costs involved in remodeling your garage can seem overwhelming. Our guide makes it easier to wrap your head around.

A garage can be so much more than a messy catch-all for items that don’t fit inside the home. Through a remodel, it can be made into an organized storage unit or a workshop, or simply made more functional, with room for at least one car. Turning a standard 600-square-foot, two-car garage into a well-organized, tidy space is less expensive than most remodeling projects. Because a garage already has a floor, walls and a roof, the primary tasks are finishing the framed walls and adding organizational systems.
Have a ballpark figure in mind. Determine what you can comfortably afford to spend on your garage remodeling or building project. Where does it fall in your list of home improvement priorities? Will you be spending 100% of your remodeling and construction budget on it? Having a clear idea of your price ceiling will help you avoid making choices that are too expensive or elaborate and having to scale back in the process.
The floors of your new space are a unique issue. Your garage is built with drainage in mind. Code requirements mandate that the concrete slab has a slope built into it to ensure water drains away from the home. The installation of the subfloor will correct the slope issue of your floor. Using a subfloor allows your new space to be converted back into a garage should the next home owner wish to do so.
Most rough-framed garages aren’t ready for drywall. Your garage may be missing studs at the corners and attachment points for the ceiling drywall. To see where framing members may be missing, inspect inside corners where walls meet and where the walls meet the ceiling. These are the most common areas needing additional framing. These two photos show how to add ceiling blocking.
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