Your garage is an often untouched part of your home. The uncomfortable truth is that far too often it is not used for our vehicles. A study put the percentage of homes that actually use their garages for parking at an astonishing 15%. This means the overwhelming number of garages are merely storage rooms.  This is especially true when you have a smaller one. The costs involved in remodeling your garage can seem overwhelming. Our guide makes it easier to wrap your head around.
Pick: Pick what your new room is going to focus on. Your small garage can either do one thing perfectly or a lot of things partially. Think of it like any small room in your home. Your small bedroom wouldn’t be able to be a bedroom, media room, work space, and storage area. Your small garage can’t do all of these things either. So pick one focus and ensure your plan addresses it. Some average room sizes to help you pick are:

Waterproof paint (for concrete walls) • Paint (dry wall) • Behr concrete cleaner (2 Gal) • Behr Concrete Etcher (2 Gal) • Behr Concrete Bonding Primer (1 Gal) • Behr 1-Part Epoxy Paint (2 Gal.) • MiscPainting Supplies • Stainless steel light switch/receptical covers • Lumber for cabinet over circuit breakers • Gladiator Garage Works workbench-Wall cabinets-tall cabinet • Hooks for bicycles/tools • Tapcon masonary drill bits • PVC (to run wires for garage door openers
The first step is often fixing a cracked floor or leveling it, and sometimes even staining it to make it look more attractive; the repairs cost $500-$12,500, and stains range from $2 to $10 per square foot. Drywall is typically put up, which costs from $1 to $2 per square foot. Adding boards for a storage space above the garage typically costs about $2 per square foot.
As you plan, the following tips can be indispensable. Don’t start without giving this list a look. Our list can save money, time, and money, and hassle. Go over these tips and apply all the ones you can to your own project. Remember that this is a starting point and that you should try to use these to help your own brainstorming for more ideas specific to your own situation.

For a garage-to-utility-room conversion, budget at least $6,000 for appliances, a utility sink, and space for sorting, folding and hanging laundry. A new utility room in place of an old garage brings convenience into your life, especially if you've spent years dragging loads of laundry up and down the stairs. This conversion will cost a bit more due to the addition of plumbing, but it'll be worth it.
Garages have minimal insulation, so if you’re renovating your garage to turn it into an office or family room, you’ll certainly need to add insulation and HVAC. Your insulation pro will start with the ceilings and floors. Beyond that, they may or may not choose to add insulated garage doors (if doors are being kept). All in all, adding new HVAC and insulation can add $2,000 to $3,000 to your garage remodel cost.
The overhead garage door can be a big source of drafts and heat loss. Recently installed doors usually include a weather-stripped stop around the perimeter. But older doors may be lacking a weather strip. Luckily, it’s an easy fix. Garage door weather stripping is available at home centers and hardware stores, and installation is straightforward. If your overhead door is uninsulated, search online for “garage door insulating kits.”
The cost to finish a garage is often less than the cost of a remodel, coming in at an average of about $5,000. Finishes should factor high on your list of materials before you ever begin your garage conversion. The answers to the following questions will go far in determining your budget. Low-end finishes will save you big bucks at the time of renovation, but high-end finishes will help recoup your ROI when it comes time to sell.
We are extremely satisfied with our choice to use Dots Remodeling. We spent several days looking at colors where they presented multiple options for us to choose from. They are professional and very patient as they worked. on our exterior house paint job. Not only did they meet the expectations set by neighbors who had worked with them in the past, they also went above and beyond to exceed them. From start to finish, Dots demonstrated their professionalism, expertise, customer service, and true passion for their business. It is clear that their true purpose is to ensure their client���s complete satisfaction. They put in the time, effort, and energy to ensure that they accomplish this goal.
Before launching a project, the homeowner should draw up a plan that takes into account the various ways the garage could ideally be used. GarageAbility, for instance, will divide a garage into zones for storing garden equipment, sporting goods and tools as well as space for working on hobbies, then help the homeowner determine the storage systems that will work best for their belongings.
Start by insulating the walls. Buy unfaced R-13 batts for 2×4 walls and unfaced R-19 batts for 2×6 walls. Match the width of the batt (15-1/4 in. or 23-1/4 in.) to the stud space. Cut batts carefully for a tight fit. Next, staple 4-mil poly to the walls and ceiling. Embed the poly sheeting in caulk around the perimeter of each piece to create an airtight seal. Seal the seams between sheets and seal the poly to electrical boxes with caulk or special sheathing tape (it’s typically red and looks like packing tape).
Leaky doors and windows let in uncomfortable drafts and increase heating and cooling costs. Check your garage service door to be sure it has good weather stripping and a threshold that seals tightly to the bottom of the door. In most cases, if your service door is missing a threshold and weather stripping, it’s more efficient to replace the door with a new, weather-tight version. You can buy an inexpensive prehung metal exterior door at home centers and lumberyards. 
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