Determine needs vs wants: There is always a difference between what you WANT in your garage, and what you NEED. While you may want a high end entertainment complex, do you need it? Before you begin your project sit down and make a list of needs, and wants. By creating a prioritized list you keep yourself from overspending. Once you have your needs addressed, throw in a few wants.
Hiring a remodeling expert really is necessary. A professional will ensure that all building permits and inspections are up to date. They can also redo your garage space to make it more appealing -- both visually and functionally. Garages are an important consideration for homebuyers when deciding whether to buy a property. Displaying a professional finish can go a long way in helping you get the best price possible for your home.
Have a ballpark figure in mind. Determine what you can comfortably afford to spend on your garage remodeling or building project. Where does it fall in your list of home improvement priorities? Will you be spending 100% of your remodeling and construction budget on it? Having a clear idea of your price ceiling will help you avoid making choices that are too expensive or elaborate and having to scale back in the process.
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Most unfinished garages have the bare minimum of outlets and lights, so you’ll want to add a few. And in some cases, you’ll have to reroute wiring that’s attached to the face of studs or the underside of ceiling framing. We had to reroute phone wires, door opener control wires and plastic-sheathed cable in our garage. Remove surface-mounted wiring and move it into the stud space, or reroute it over the top of the ceiling joists or trusses.
The real truth about increasing your home value is that it is not a one size fits all situation. There is no one magic bullet that will make your garage into something that others want. Each home is unique and an idea that is great of one situation will be completely out of place in another. Take the time to research the ideas we have outlined above, and compare them to what is in the neighborhood. Your best choice is one you make for your home and that appeals to buyers.
Most unfinished garages have the bare minimum of outlets and lights, so you’ll want to add a few. And in some cases, you’ll have to reroute wiring that’s attached to the face of studs or the underside of ceiling framing. We had to reroute phone wires, door opener control wires and plastic-sheathed cable in our garage. Remove surface-mounted wiring and move it into the stud space, or reroute it over the top of the ceiling joists or trusses.

Like wood stains, masonry stains are less viscous than paints. They soak into the masonry and don't form a film the way paint does. Unlike film-forming coatings, stains won't make your garage floor feel like the deck of an aircraft carrier. Because of this, stains are somewhat more forgiving and easier to apply and reapply as they wear off and become dirty. One of the oldest (perhaps the oldest) masonry stains available is H&C, now owned by Sherwin-Williams and sold at local paint stores. This venerable brand has been used in the Southern U.S. for many years. It's available in a wide range of colors and it can be tinted to any color you prefer. It's available in two formulations: a solvent-base (that is unavailable in California) and a waterborne acrylic available nationwide. The solvent-based formulation is the tougher one, so if you have both available, choose the stronger route unless you're very sensitive to solvent fumes.
An insulated garage will stay cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. The first step is to be sure the attic is well ventilated. Check to see how many attic and roof vents you have. A good rule of thumb is a total of 1 sq. ft. (144 sq. in.) of vent opening per 300 sq. ft. of attic divided between the soffit and roof vents. For a typical 20 x 22-ft. garage, you’d need about six 4-in. x 12-in. soffit vents and two standard square roof vents. Make sure your ventilation is effective by installing vent chutes between the trusses. Vent chutes have a channel that prevents blown insulation from blocking the airflow from the soffit vents to the attic space. Plug the area under the vent with wood blocking or plastic and a chunk of fiberglass insulation to prevent wind from blowing up through the insulation or insulation from filling the soffit.
Every city has certain building codes all homes must follow. One popular item many homeowners have to add when they convert their garage into a living area or bedroom is a new window. Building codes require living spaces to have a window large enough for a person to crawl out of in case of an emergency. Single window installation costs start at $1,200.

Additions & RemodelsAcoustic CeilingsArchitectureCarpentryCarpet CleaningCleaningDecks & PatiosDemolitionDesignersDoorsDrywall & InsulationElectricalEngineeringFencingFlooringGaragesGlass & MirrorsGuttersHandymanHome SecurityHome TheaterHome BuilderHome InspectorsJunk RemovalHVACLandscapingMasonryPainting & StainingPavingPest RemovalPlumbingRoofingSidingSnow RemovalSolarSwimming PoolsTesting & AbatementTile & StoneTree RemovalWindows
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