The cost to finish a garage is often less than the cost of a remodel, coming in at an average of about $5,000. Finishes should factor high on your list of materials before you ever begin your garage conversion. The answers to the following questions will go far in determining your budget. Low-end finishes will save you big bucks at the time of renovation, but high-end finishes will help recoup your ROI when it comes time to sell.
If you're planning to maximize the space, add useful features, and otherwise make changes that are likely to appeal to a majority of homeowners, your renovation may end up being a worthwhile investment in your home's resale value. However, the quality of the work matters, especially if you're planning a major change such as converting the garage into a bedroom. Trading your garage space for a poorly insulated "bedroom" with no windows and the garage door intact won't do much to boost resale value.
When it comes to design, nothing provides more a boost than the actual garage door. Not only can they match the architecture of your home, but they come in a wide range of sizes, styles and components. Chances are, you already have a garage door, but years of opening and closing, along with general wear and tear, can bring about a fair share of issues.
If you don’t want to spend $10,000 on a garage remodel, you could partially finish your garage. You can frame a concrete garage the same way you you’d finish a basement. Wooden crossbeams are secured to the floor, and the remainder of the framing is built up from there. Walls of either paneling or sheetrock can then be fastened, making your garage look and feel like another room of the house. Sheetrock is very often used for garage ceilings, allowing you to choose a paint color, and the same can be said for the walls. This is a job any general contractor can accomplish for a few thousand dollars. You could use metal studs, as opposed to wood, when framing to cut down material costs significantly.
An insulated garage will stay cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. The first step is to be sure the attic is well ventilated. Check to see how many attic and roof vents you have. A good rule of thumb is a total of 1 sq. ft. (144 sq. in.) of vent opening per 300 sq. ft. of attic divided between the soffit and roof vents. For a typical 20 x 22-ft. garage, you’d need about six 4-in. x 12-in. soffit vents and two standard square roof vents. Make sure your ventilation is effective by installing vent chutes between the trusses. Vent chutes have a channel that prevents blown insulation from blocking the airflow from the soffit vents to the attic space. Plug the area under the vent with wood blocking or plastic and a chunk of fiberglass insulation to prevent wind from blowing up through the insulation or insulation from filling the soffit.
As the wife and I gear up to make our way back to our hometown here in North Florida, we’re seriously considering building a new house on some acreage, since we can’t find anything that we really are looking to call our last home. Naturally, I’ve already been working on designing my stand-alone dream garage. I mean, as long as we’re building stuff… ?
I just finished "re-modeling" my garage...before I touched it it had just taped drywall and concrete block walls, unfinished cement floor, wires for the garage door openers hanging all over the place, holes in all the walls/ceiling. It was a typical, dirty, dark garage.I painted the concrete walls with Behr waterproof masonry paint and the rest of the walls and ceiling with the same color behr paint (twilight gray-to lighten it up).I did the floor with Behr 1 Part Epoxy, which, takes forever to prep for, but the result is worth it. You first need to sweep very good, then clean/de-grease and etch the concrete using a floor cleaner rented from HD...then let it dry. I let it dry for about 2 weeks. Once I was sure the concrete was dry, I applied 2 coats of concrete bonding primer. I let that dry for about 24 hours, and I was finally ready for the paint. The paint goes on easy, one coat was plenty. I sprinlled in some color flakes and let it dry 24hrs. I then began my first of three coates of low gloss sealer. The finished result was very pleasing...I then re-installed my Gladiator Garage Works 8 foot work bench, wall cabinet and tool chest as well as a second wall cabinet and large gearbox that I purchased for my new garage... I also built a wooden cabinet around the circuit breakers and painted it gray along with the framing for the garage doors, a beam in the middle and the door into the house. I finished with gray vinyl trim molding around the walls.I also mounted the bikes, a shop Vac and misc. brooms, saw horse, etc... on the wall(s). All of the wires from the garage door openers were hanging down and sloppy (prev. owner) so I disconected everything and ran it through PVC for a cleaner look. I then added a few finishing touches, Bud Light neon clock, pictures (NE Patriots Cheerleaders), and mounted my novelty license plate collection as well as a few other items...Moving all of my furniture/tools out of the garage was a big project in itself, and I lost my basement(i.e. Gym) for about a month and a half, but the end result is a very clean, organized garage that is "my" place...

Garages have minimal insulation, so if you’re renovating your garage to turn it into an office or family room, you’ll certainly need to add insulation and HVAC. Your insulation pro will start with the ceilings and floors. Beyond that, they may or may not choose to add insulated garage doors (if doors are being kept). All in all, adding new HVAC and insulation can add $2,000 to $3,000 to your garage remodel cost.


Your garage remodeling project isn’t necessarily the easiest endeavor. Too often a homeowner will just forge ahead with a great idea and hope it turns our alright. Needless to say, this is not often the case, most remodels do not go easily. Even if you think of a good plan, it probably is missing something. Trust us, unless you are a professional contractor, you haven’t thought of everything. Our tips will make you look like you have done this a thousand times.
Update Fixtures: If you have either old, or the most basic fixtures spend a little money and upgrade them. Utility lighting doesn’t have to be bare bulbs with an economy base. Use fixtures that fit into your garage design. Sometimes it has exterior lights, or interior lighting fixtures that just look completely out of place. Make sure you change out these fixtures to ones that fit the area.

Update Fixtures: If you have either old, or the most basic fixtures spend a little money and upgrade them. Utility lighting doesn’t have to be bare bulbs with an economy base. Use fixtures that fit into your garage design. Sometimes it has exterior lights, or interior lighting fixtures that just look completely out of place. Make sure you change out these fixtures to ones that fit the area.
And you really need your investments protected, but you just don’t have the funds to build some of these other options. Well, don’t give up hope. This video shows you how to build a pretty decent structure that will do what you need it to do for basically no money. And honestly, if you have the materials on hand it could actually be built for free.
×