Your garage is an often untouched part of your home. The uncomfortable truth is that far too often it is not used for our vehicles. A study put the percentage of homes that actually use their garages for parking at an astonishing 15%. This means the overwhelming number of garages are merely storage rooms.  This is especially true when you have a smaller one. The costs involved in remodeling your garage can seem overwhelming. Our guide makes it easier to wrap your head around.
A garage remodel is usually much cheaper than a home renovation because the foundation, roof, and walls are already built. Many garages also have electrical and plumbing installed to some extent. The actual cost of a garage remodeling project, however, depends on what the renovated space will be used for. While a new home gym won't require much in the way of amenities, converting a garage to an office, apartment, or bedroom requires adding significantly more creature comforts.

For a garage-to-utility-room conversion, budget at least $6,000 for appliances, a utility sink, and space for sorting, folding and hanging laundry. A new utility room in place of an old garage brings convenience into your life, especially if you've spent years dragging loads of laundry up and down the stairs. This conversion will cost a bit more due to the addition of plumbing, but it'll be worth it.
Flooring: Concrete slabs are cold, hard, and not very pretty to the eyes. Even if you’re on a tight budget, installing new floors during your garage conversion could be worth your while in terms of comfort and aesthetics. Vinyl flooring is one of the more cost-effective options and is available in many different designs made to look like wood, tile, or natural stone. If the space is framed in and moisture isn’t a concern, carpet is also a viable option for softer flooring as long as insulation occurs beforehand.
Before launching a project, the homeowner should draw up a plan that takes into account the various ways the garage could ideally be used. GarageAbility, for instance, will divide a garage into zones for storing garden equipment, sporting goods and tools as well as space for working on hobbies, then help the homeowner determine the storage systems that will work best for their belongings.
The cost to finish a garage is often less than the cost of a remodel, coming in at an average of about $5,000. Finishes should factor high on your list of materials before you ever begin your garage conversion. The answers to the following questions will go far in determining your budget. Low-end finishes will save you big bucks at the time of renovation, but high-end finishes will help recoup your ROI when it comes time to sell.

If you have an existing garage in place, but no walls, floor, ceiling or finishes in place, the cost to finish your garage will be much less expensive than $10,000. Oftentimes, finished a garage entails adding a few beams or drywall. Contractors can install wooden or steal beams for a few thousand dollars. In addition, according to our drywall installation cost guide, you can purchase drywall for at little as $0.30/sf. If you hire a general contractor to install the drywall, expect to pay another $1,000. Overall, the cost to finish a garage should not exceed $5,000.
Paint manufacturers have recognized these problems and have come to the rescue with new solutions. But a word of advice: If your garage floor sees heavy water leakage, if it's badly cracked or if it's damp and slimy all summer, don't apply any coating. In those cases, you're better off simply keeping it as clean as you can and then calling it quits.
A 'Ready to Sell' garage remodel will give you the best ROI possible without the need for a permit. It may include finishing interior texture (already sheetrocked), painting, and changing a few light fixtures. This level is perfect for those who are preparing their home for sale and tends to be cosmetic in nature in order to present the home well to potential buyers.
An insulated garage will stay cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. The first step is to be sure the attic is well ventilated. Check to see how many attic and roof vents you have. A good rule of thumb is a total of 1 sq. ft. (144 sq. in.) of vent opening per 300 sq. ft. of attic divided between the soffit and roof vents. For a typical 20 x 22-ft. garage, you’d need about six 4-in. x 12-in. soffit vents and two standard square roof vents. Make sure your ventilation is effective by installing vent chutes between the trusses. Vent chutes have a channel that prevents blown insulation from blocking the airflow from the soffit vents to the attic space. Plug the area under the vent with wood blocking or plastic and a chunk of fiberglass insulation to prevent wind from blowing up through the insulation or insulation from filling the soffit.

Naturally, you have to know the cost of these things in order to calculate what you can afford to spend. That’s also the best way to ensure that you don’t stumble across any unwelcome surprises during the execution of your project. Using our free estimate for your garage remodel will help you create a realistic budget that actually meets your needs!


Unlike many other home remodeling projects, it’s very easy to tell when you need to replace your garage door spring; your overhead garage door won’t open or perhaps more obvious, the weight of the door is off. When your spring is working correctly, you should be able to manually lift the garage door very easily. Likewise, when you open it, the garage door should not move and stay where you left it. If the garage door is very heavy or it closes as soon as you let go, then you need a new spring.
There are certain garage remodel facts that apply to almost every project. Rather than you spending your day digging them out of the corners of the internet, we have put them together for you. These quick facts will let you make some informed decisions. Even if these facts don’t help you make decisions, they will give you a better knowledge base as you begin.
One of the biggest impacts you can make to a refreshed garage has little to do with the garage itself: Add containers potted with pretty blooms. The planters help to soften the edges between structure and landscape and add pops of visual interest to what is often a neutral facade. Here, miniature trellises up the columns add even more growing spots, with delicate vines that clamor up toward the pergola. Another idea: Use hanging baskets on either side of a garage’s door.
Paint manufacturers have recognized these problems and have come to the rescue with new solutions. But a word of advice: If your garage floor sees heavy water leakage, if it's badly cracked or if it's damp and slimy all summer, don't apply any coating. In those cases, you're better off simply keeping it as clean as you can and then calling it quits.
×