Your garage is an often untouched part of your home. The uncomfortable truth is that far too often it is not used for our vehicles. A study put the percentage of homes that actually use their garages for parking at an astonishing 15%. This means the overwhelming number of garages are merely storage rooms.  This is especially true when you have a smaller one. The costs involved in remodeling your garage can seem overwhelming. Our guide makes it easier to wrap your head around.
With most garage renovations, flooring is usually the prime focus. Many garages are made entirely of concrete and brick work, and replacing or repairing concrete can be very costly. In cases where the floor or walls are severely damaged, a concrete mason must be called. In this scenario, materials come at a low cost, but working with concrete is very time consuming, which can lead to a large labor bill.

Update Fixtures: If you have either old, or the most basic fixtures spend a little money and upgrade them. Utility lighting doesn’t have to be bare bulbs with an economy base. Use fixtures that fit into your garage design. Sometimes it has exterior lights, or interior lighting fixtures that just look completely out of place. Make sure you change out these fixtures to ones that fit the area.

An insulated garage will stay cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. The first step is to be sure the attic is well ventilated. Check to see how many attic and roof vents you have. A good rule of thumb is a total of 1 sq. ft. (144 sq. in.) of vent opening per 300 sq. ft. of attic divided between the soffit and roof vents. For a typical 20 x 22-ft. garage, you’d need about six 4-in. x 12-in. soffit vents and two standard square roof vents. Make sure your ventilation is effective by installing vent chutes between the trusses. Vent chutes have a channel that prevents blown insulation from blocking the airflow from the soffit vents to the attic space. Plug the area under the vent with wood blocking or plastic and a chunk of fiberglass insulation to prevent wind from blowing up through the insulation or insulation from filling the soffit.
Hiring a remodeling expert really is necessary. A professional will ensure that all building permits and inspections are up to date. They can also redo your garage space to make it more appealing -- both visually and functionally. Garages are an important consideration for homebuyers when deciding whether to buy a property. Displaying a professional finish can go a long way in helping you get the best price possible for your home.
Most rough-framed garages aren’t ready for drywall. Your garage may be missing studs at the corners and attachment points for the ceiling drywall. To see where framing members may be missing, inspect inside corners where walls meet and where the walls meet the ceiling. These are the most common areas needing additional framing. These two photos show how to add ceiling blocking.

Every project comes down to cost, so it only makes sense to start there. According to our garage remodeling cost estimator, the average garage remodel runs $8,582. Keep in mind, this takes the full garage into consideration. That includes the garage door, flooring, windows and plenty of other renovations. For those remodeling one aspect of their garage, of course, expect the final price to be much less. In fact, we have even seen garage remodels cost as low as $900.
For a garage-to-utility-room conversion, budget at least $6,000 for appliances, a utility sink, and space for sorting, folding and hanging laundry. A new utility room in place of an old garage brings convenience into your life, especially if you've spent years dragging loads of laundry up and down the stairs. This conversion will cost a bit more due to the addition of plumbing, but it'll be worth it.
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